Environmental Justice

Current MLUC Projects (Join us!)

Visit the calendar or email cochairs Ruth Bowen and Pam Kosty for more detailed information:

  • Twice monthly evening Zoom meetings are open to all (times and agenda available upon request)
  • Two options for folks interested in some hands-on environmental work for our urban region. Come join us as we help clean up and green up at the edge of Philadelphia and Yeadon (Cobbs Creek Parkway and Whitby Avenue, parking lot at Thomas Avenue and Cobbs Creek Parkway one block away), with a project organized by the Darby Creek Valley Association and Audubon. Bring your own gloves; the trash bags for October or trees to plant for November, plus instructions, are provided! Please email Pam Kosty, to let the MLUC EJ team know which events you are attending.
    • For clean-up on Sunday, October 17, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., click here to register for clean-up.
    • For tree planting on Saturday, November 13, 10:00 a.m. to noon, click here (limited availability for the tree planting!).
  • Meet the Author, Unleaded: How Changing Our Gasoline Changed Everything Thursday October, 28, 7:00 p.m. Unleaded by Carrie Nielsen, tells the story of how crusading scientists and activists persuaded the U.S. government to ban lead additives in gasoline. It also reveals how, for nearly 50 years, scientific experts paid by the oil and mining industries abused their authority to convince the public that leaded gasoline was perfectly harmless. Click here to register for book discussion. 
About this Team:

MLUC has a strong legacy of environmental education and action, with the first ECO group (Earth Concerns Organization) founded at the church in 1990. The congregation is justly proud of the Green Sanctuary certification received from the UUA Ministry for Earth in 2003. You can see the church’s commitment to a sustainable planet with its solar panels and other carbon-emissions-cutting efforts in the building, and even at coffee hour with the Green Stripers program providing reusable ceramic cups to save on paper and plastic waste.

Today, Ruth Bowen and Pam Kosty cochair the Environmental Justice Team. A solid group of 40 to 50 members and friends keep updated on the team’s efforts and join when they can, and about 8 to 12 folks typically attend twice-monthly meetings, which have shifted to Zoom with the pandemic.

The Environmental Justice Team is supported by UUJusticePA, the Unitarian Universalists’ state advocacy group, and participates in the Main Line Interfaith Power and Light green group, which is part of the state and national Interfaith Power and Light, committed to mobilizing a religious response to global warming.

 

Why Join the Environmental Justice Team at MLUC?

There are a lot of terrific environmental groups in our area, and much that members of our church can and do in partnership with them. So, why join our group? The truth is that climate change, pollution and growing environmental degradation is real, and when we face it, thinking about our own families and future generations, it is frightening. The work we do supporting environmental justice is vital, but slow progress and setbacks can be frustrating. How can environmental-justice advocates sustain themselves and others in this difficult work? One answer can be found at our church and supportive community, and in a striving for spiritual connection: We come to this work not from a place of anxiety and fear, but with love, appreciation for nature and the natural world, and one another. This perspective is really important to avoid burnout.

The reality is that human-caused climate change presents us with a clear moral problem, and faith-based organizations like ours have a unique role to play in bearing witness and seeking solutions.

 

What is the Environmental Justice Team Doing Today?

We’ve been busy despite the pandemic, offering film programs and discussions, writing letters to the editor and editorials, developing testimonials for the PA Department of Environmental Protection, promoting petitions, sharing information with the wider congregation, collaborating with our Garden Committee, joining forces with the regional interfaith green group, and offering Zoom meetings with outside experts. Pooling our resources, we’ve been learning the hows and whys of composting, developing fun and easy eco tips that everyone can use, and even sharing local nature-walk destinations.

Our Environmental Justice Team offers opportunities to connect with the natural world and each other. We strive build up and support one another as we learn, serve, advocate for and promote a more sustainable world. We make sure to have fun, too—and are always happy to welcome guests and new members!

 

How Can You Get Involved?

The good news is that there is so much to learn and do as we advocate for and promote a more just, sustainable world for all. Everyone’s talents, interests and perspectives are needed.

Let us know of your interest with an email to Pam Kosty or Ruth Bowen.

Is there something you would like to learn about, organize or see happen? We can add you to our Environmental Justice Team meeting and program announcements and notes. Help us make a difference!